Corbuffet Becomes First Art-Roused Cookbooks To Display Recipes As Sculpts

Cookbooks are a blessing for those who have zero clues about the wonders and tactics of cooking. But, most of them are monotonous in their approach, the same dishes, presented in the same manner across several varieties of these handy manuals. However, one lady is challenging the norm by portraying the dishes in her magazine as works of artistic hews.

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The recipe booklet which is a brainchild of Esther Choi, a photographer, artist, and writer, is named Le Corbuffet: Edible Art and Design Classics. It ensembles a list of cooking procedures to pay homage to the artistic, designing and creative skills of renowned figures such as Frida Kahlo and Barbara Kruger. It includes dishes such as the crisp and bright Frida Kale-o Sala, crimson-colored acerbic Rhubrbara Kruger Compote. The idea was to incorporate the qualities of these contemporary celebrities into the dishes both preparation as well as presentation-wise.

The theme was first introduced at a series of participant-based dinner nights hosted by the creator. What inspired her was the 1937 menu that she discovered. It was created for the renowned architect Walter Gropius who also happened to be the founder of Bauhaus. The beautiful work was done by László Moholy-Nagy. After several months of hard work and creating her own set of recipes, she decided to launch her very own cookbook.

The first round of the ‘Le Corbuffet’ series dinner was held at her apartment in Brooklyn, this project carried on for almost two years. The guests were from different assortments and were offered weirdly named pun-intended dishes. Her idea involved deliberate twisting of phrases and idioms to check the impact of fancy names and levels of aesthetic consumptions on consumers’ perception and taste. And as she thoughts, most of them gobbled up the entire platter.

Le Corbuffet hits the markets on October 1, 2019 and the snippets of it have been released online. Choi proudly describes her release as a cookbook inspired by conceptual art.